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How to Avoid and Deal with Pelvic Mesh Litigation

TASA ID: 10840

Republished with permission.

Abstract 

Medical malpractice as it relates to transvaginal mesh implantation adds another level of responsibility when deciding on surgical options to repair stress urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. As mesh is a viable option for repair, the informed consent process must involve a time commitment to discuss thoroughly the knowns and unknowns about mesh, and potentially must cover other aspects related to surgery: FDA classification of mesh, experience, potential off label usage, and conflicts of interest. A therapeutic alliance must be developed between physician and patient to allay possible fears about the intrinsic uncertainty of surgery. Proper risk assessment of the patient and pre-operative judgment as to when and if mesh implantation is appropriate are decisions that must be documented. Resolution of a conflict from a complication can be dealt with formally or informally. Above all, sharp skills, good communication, broad knowledge base of mesh surgeries, complication management, knowledge of guidelines, along with methodical documentation can mitigate or avert mesh-related litigation.

To read more, download the PDF below.

Life Care Planning For Spinal Cord Injuries

HEIDI PAUL, PH.D., CRC, CLCP, LPCC Associate Professor Coordinator MS Counseling, Option Rehabilitation California State University, Los Angeles

TASA ID:

A spinal cord injury (SCI) is harm to the spinal cord which causes physical, physiological, and/or emotional changes in an individual. Each year, there are 17,500 new spinal cord injuries, in the United States, there are between 245,000 and 353,000 Americans living with a spinal cord injury. Most spinal cord injuries occur in people ages 16-30 years old. The leading causes of spinal cord injuries, in order of most common: motor vehicle accidents, followed by falls, violence, and sporting accidents.

The spinal cord is part of the Central Nervous System (CNS), which consists of the brain and spinal cord. The Central Nervous system is responsible for receiving, integrating, and responding to environmental information. In addition, the CNS keeps our hearts beating, our lungs breathing, as well as metabolic processes functioning (involuntary functions). The CNS executes all muscle movement needed for accomplishing activities of daily life, feeding, dressing, toileting, bathing, transferring, and continence (voluntary function). 


WHEN A PUBLIC COMPANY EMBARKS UPON FRANCHISING

TASA ID: 11532

The process of seeking and finding qualified franchisees is not only the first step to building a strong franchise network, but it lays the foundation for attracting future stockholders that tend to retain their stock during good times and bad.

The reverse is also true; franchisees that own stock in the franchisor-public company are less inclined to be “breakaway” franchisees or vociferous disenchanted franchisees that are receptive to joining class action suits against the franchisor.

What Every Small Business Needs to Know About Avoiding Wrongful Termination Lawsuits

TASA ID: 321

Small businesses are as vulnerable to wrongful termination lawsuits as much as large businesses. While I am not an attorney, as a small business owner who does a great deal of consulting work with HR departments, I think it’s imperative to know the risks and issues surrounding employee terminations. Wrongful terminations, also known as wrongful discharges or wrongful dismissals are legal terms that describe a situation where an employee was fired and the reason for the firing appears to be against the law. There are many causes for this but no matter the cause; it can be costly for a small business to be sued. Studies have shown that a company's legal costs in a wrongful termination lawsuit can run up to $85,000, and that winning plaintiffs receive judgments averaging $500,000.

What Is A Life Care Plan?

HEIDI PAUL, PH.D., CRC, CLCP, LPCC Associate Professor Coordinator MS Counseling, Option Rehabilitation California State University, Los Angeles

TASA ID:

A life care plan is an organized and comprehensive plan that identifies an individual’s current and future medical needs or equipment for those who have suffered a catastrophic injury resulting in ongoing health care and personal needs. Life care plans identify service needs, such as future medical care, future surgeries, medications, diagnostic testing, evaluations, therapeutic modalities, independent functioning, wheelchair/scooter, orthotics/prosthetics, home furnishings and accessories, home/facility care, architectural renovations, and orthopedic equipment.

The plan should be well organized, clearly identifying the life care needs with a beginning and ending date for each service, the frequency and cost of the service, and the total cost for all sessions, treatments, or evaluations.  Cost for the same service should come from more than one provider, ideally obtaining costs from three different providers of the same service will yield the best estimate of cost. 
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