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Benefits of Knowing Your Defendant's IQ

TASA ID:

Did you know that knowing the IQ score of the defendant you are representing can actually be of great benefit? When arguing that IQ is a significant cause of crime, researchers cite studies to indicate that criminal populations usually have an average IQ of approximately 92 which is eight points below the mean. The relationship between IQ and criminality is particularly distinct within a small portion of the population, primarily younger men, who are responsible for committing a disproportionate amount of crime while higher intelligence acts as protection against lapsing into criminal activity for people who are otherwise at risk.

A Case of Abrupt Onset Sexual Predatory Behavior with Minors

TASA ID: 1650

In legal cases involving the apparent abrupt onset of illegal sexual behavior with minors, prosecutors and defense attorneys should be alert to the possibility of behavior-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTLD) as a causation factor in young adults where there is no prior history. While the signs and symptoms of this brain dysfunction are generally seen in individuals age 50 and older, they can occasionally appear as early as age 20. The relevant signs of bvFLTD are...

Autism, Behavioral Treatments, Medications, and the Law

TASA ID: 11342

According to federal law, a functional behavior assessment and a behavior intervention plan should be considered for any student (up to age 21) that has a behavior that interferes with learning.1  An effective behavior assessment needs to examine the antecedents and consequences of a behavior to find out why the behavior is occurring.  Different behaviors can have different functions and each functional behavior assessment needs to examine behaviors separately.   For example...

What I've Learned As An Expert Witness

Sexual Abuse in the Treatment Room

TASA ID: 4192

"There is no doubt that the vast majority of massage therapists and bodyworkers are honest, hardworking professionals who would never engage in sexual misconduct of any kind. Unfortunately, some individuals who enter our profession lack the integrity, psychological boundaries, or mental and emotional stability to practice ethically." 

The Use of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Civil Litigation

TASA ID: 4724

Descriptions of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were first recorded in the sixth century B.C. Though the symptoms associated with the illness have remained generally the same, the name of the condition itself has changed many times. In World War I the disorder was labeled “shell shock,” linking the condition to the close lines between battling armies and the continuous firing of munitions. In World War II, the condition came to be called “combat neurosis.” The term “post-traumatic stress disorder” entered the psychiatric nomenclature with the 1980 publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd Edition

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