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The Danger of Armchair Psychology

TASA ID: 22108

Imagine you are driving along the highway, and see an electric sign saying, “79 traffic deaths this year.” Would this make you less likely to crash your car shortly after seeing the sign? Perhaps you think it would have no effect.

Neither are true. According to a recent peer-reviewed study that just came out in Science, one of the world’s top academic journals, you would be more likely to crash, not less. Talk about unintended consequences!

The study examined seven years of data from 880 electric highway signs, which showed the number of deaths so far this year for one week each month as part of a safety campaign. The researchers found that the number of crashes increased by 1.52% within three miles of the signs on these safety campaign weeks compared to the other weeks of the month when the signs did not show fatality information.

That is about the same impact as raising the speed limit by four miles or decreasing the number of highway troopers by 10%. The scientists calculated that the social costs of such fatality messages amount to $377 million per year, with 2,600 additional crashes and 16 deaths.

Say, "Hello!" to the CHO

TASA ID: 22108

The pandemic has led to an undeniable awareness of the need for a new C-suite leader, the CHO or the Chief Health Officer. This has been driven by the recognition of the importance of employee health for engagement, productivity, and risk management, along with lowering healthcare insurance costs. At the same time, more and more employees are reporting growing mental and physical health challenges in these troubled times.

In the race to keep employees safe while keeping productivity and morale up, organizations are realizing that simply offering yoga and other wellness programs through Employee Assistance Programs will not cut it. This awareness ushered in the need for a top executive whose sole focus is on optimizing employee health, physical and mental, for the sake of company bottom lines.

Thus, say hello to the Chief Health Officer, the new C-suite leader who is both captain and curator of an organization’s health policies. The CHO is in charge of dealing with the health of employees, both physical and mental.

Omicron Reveals the Fundamental Lack of Nonprofit Leadership Vision About the Future of Work

TASA ID: 22108

Leaders are sticking their heads into the sand of reality on Omicron. Unless they take needed steps, the results may be catastrophic for their nonprofits.

Omicron took over from Delta in the US in late December. The CDC warns that Omicron’s higher infectivity and ability to escape vaccines will overwhelm many hospitals in January.

Unfortunately, most organizations are not pivoting effectively to meet Omicron. From the start of the pandemic, many leaders insisted on a return to a “normal” office-centric culture. That’s despite the fact that a large majority of employees express a strong desire for a flexible hybrid or fully remote schedule.

Benefits of Knowing Your Defendant's IQ

TASA ID:

Did you know that knowing the IQ score of the defendant you are representing can actually be of great benefit? When arguing that IQ is a significant cause of crime, researchers cite studies to indicate that criminal populations usually have an average IQ of approximately 92 which is eight points below the mean. The relationship between IQ and criminality is particularly distinct within a small portion of the population, primarily younger men, who are responsible for committing a disproportionate amount of crime while higher intelligence acts as protection against lapsing into criminal activity for people who are otherwise at risk.

A Case of Abrupt Onset Sexual Predatory Behavior with Minors

TASA ID: 1650

In legal cases involving the apparent abrupt onset of illegal sexual behavior with minors, prosecutors and defense attorneys should be alert to the possibility of behavior-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTLD) as a causation factor in young adults where there is no prior history. While the signs and symptoms of this brain dysfunction are generally seen in individuals age 50 and older, they can occasionally appear as early as age 20. The relevant signs of bvFLTD are...
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