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The Use of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Civil Litigation

TASA ID: 4724

Descriptions of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were first recorded in the sixth century B.C. Though the symptoms associated with the illness have remained generally the same, the name of the condition itself has changed many times. In World War I the disorder was labeled “shell shock,” linking the condition to the close lines between battling armies and the continuous firing of munitions. In World War II, the condition came to be called “combat neurosis.” The term “post-traumatic stress disorder” entered the psychiatric nomenclature with the 1980 publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd Edition

SCOPE OF THE PRACTICE OF ANESTHESIOLOGY

TASA ID: 1082

In today's medical environment with the increasing use of the Care Team Model to provide patient care services, anesthesiologists also provide onsite, immediately available medical direction of non-physician providers such as Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA's) who participate in the delivery of anesthesia care to the patient. The scope of the practice of anesthesiology also includes overseeing preoperative evaluation clinics and administrative responsibilities in the daily management of the operating room surgery schedule.

Workplace Violence in Hospitals

Prevention, Mitigation and Recovery

TASA ID: 2402

The image of today’s hospital being the “safe haven” it was years ago, is no longer true; unless hospitals make the safety of their staff of paramount concern.

Security in hospitals is a sliding scale of professionalism; in many hospitals Security still reports to Food or Building Services, as it’s seen as a cost “burden” and one that can be buried in an already fragile budget.


Saddle Trauma and the Mechanical Bull

TASA ID: 4298

Introduction

The author is a forensic engineer with a Ph.D in biomechanical engineering and is licensed in several states as a structural and professional engineer. The author is employed by Packer Engineering Group, a firm that investigates accidents and injuries, and provides expert opinions to their clients as well as in a court of law. 

Packer was contacted because of a lawsuit involving an injury on a mechanical bull. The firm was requested to investigate reported injuries, validate the injured individual’s account of the accident and the cause of his injuries, and issue a written report.

This report was, therefore, written as a response to the lawsuit. Details were redacted and replaced with general terms for anonymity. 

OVERVIEW OF BENZENE TOXICITY

TASA ID: 1351

I.  Background Information

Benzene is a clear, colorless liquid at ambient temperatures.  Benzene has a relatively high vapor pressure and thus evaporates quickly into the air.  The odor threshold for benzene has been reported as 12 parts per million.  Benzene occurs naturally in crude oil and is widely used in industry as a raw material for the production of other organic chemicals.  Most gasolines sold in this country contain between one and two percent benzene (World Health Organization, 1993; ACGIH, 2001; Bruckner, et al., 2008).  Benzene is present in most outdoor and indoor environments.  Most benzene exposures to the general public are associated with the use of gasoline powered vehicles and other equipment.  Benzene is also found in some consumer products and is present in main stream and side stream tobacco smoke (Wallace, 1996).

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