Menu
0

800-523-2319experts@tasanet.com

Articles

Is Your Copyright Notice Enough?

How to know whether you need to do more to protect your content and your brand

TASA ID: 7210

* This article was originally published in Pages magazine, Winter 2018, published by Lane Press in South Burlington, Vermont. www.pagesthemagazine.com

___________

You invest a lot in your content. As a publisher, it’s everything. You commit money, time, and talent to creating original content that’s valuable to your particular audience — and this resulting content effectively constitutes your brand. It’s who you are.

As such, you want your content to be available and accessible only through you (or through established relationships that preserve the stamp of your brand). To leverage your investment, you want readers to get your magazine to read your content. Go to your website to access it. Attend your events to see, hear, and experience it. You don’t want anyone copying and distributing your content in a way that separates it from your publishing brand.

This is what copyright is for.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE, CLICK TO DOWNLOAD BELOW.
_________________________

 

TASA Article Disclaimer

This article discusses issues of general interest and does not give any specific legal or business advice pertaining to any specific circumstances.  Before acting upon any of its information, you should obtain appropriate advice from a lawyer or other qualified professional.

This article may not be duplicated, altered, distributed, saved, incorporated into another document or website, or otherwise modified without the permission of TASA and the author (TASA ID#: 7210). Contact marketing@tasanet.com for any questions.

Causes of Inadvertent Disclosure of Privileged Documents and Strategies for Protecting Privileged Documents

Whitepaper

TASA ID: 1793

There is an inherent difficulty in keeping privileged documents and especially work product in e-discovery. This problem can cause the most serious damages to litigants, and consequences including anything from direct loss of cases to protracted procedural complications are reflected in a large number of cases. Each time when a privileged document is leaked, there is no real remedy. Clawing-back documents gives the producing party only a right to stop the receiving party from using the leaked documents directly. However, nothing can stop the receiving party from collecting information from other sources to strengthen its case by using the leaked documents as road maps. One should expect that the receiving party will keep copies of leaked documents for reference and may use them to cross-check anything affecting its case. Therefore, this problem must be addressed seriously. I will discuss what the main cause for the frequent leaking of privileged documents.

Analyzing Architectural Designs for Copyright Disputes

TASA ID: 10524

Introduction

There’s nothing simple about architectural copyright litigation. Activity generated from The Architectural Works Copyright Protection Act of 1990 continues to increase. The law continues to develop, but factual realities, though seemingly obvious, are often complex and difficult to compare What is an architectural work? It is a building design embodied in any tangible medium of expression, including a building itself, architectural plans, or drawings. Overall form is copyrightable. Exterior and interior spatial arrangements and elements of these arrangements are copyrightable. Individual standard features are not copyrightable. These presuppositions raise further questions. 

A Case Study of Patent Abuse (PART II): Patent Trolls on the Run —The Printing Industry Is Winning!

Whitepaper

TASA ID: 7210

This is a follow-up to my July 2016 white paper entitled, “A Case Study of Patent Abuse: Printing Industry Faces New Nemesis Impacting Growth and Employment—Patent Trolls.”

That white paper received enormous industry press coverage, and to my understanding was used as part of court proceedings resulting in the dismissal of two long and visible printing industry cases brought on by patent trolls, CTP Innovations (CTP) and High Quality Printing Innovations (HQPI). However, since then, two new cases emerged by patent trolls attempting to threaten and extort funds from printing industry companies and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) using standard technology common for doing day-to-day business in the printing and related industries.

RSS
12345

Categories


Let Us Find Your Expert 

Note: This form is to be completed by legal and insurance professionals ONLY. If you are a party in a case that requires an expert witness, please have your attorney contact TASA at 800-523-2319.

Submit

Search Experts

TASA provides a variety of quality, independent experts who meet your case criteria. Search our extensive list of experts now.

Search Experts