Menu
0

800-523-2319experts@tasanet.com

Articles

Global Economic Development Through The Utilization of The Franchise System

TASA ID: 11532

PREFACE


I
nternational franchising has fascinated me for many years.  I still get excited seeing a familiar trademark when driving down a street in New Delhi, Cairo, or Paris.  While traveling outside the United States, my wife and I will frequently play a game seeing who can point to a recognized sign first such as McDonald’s or Gold’s Gym with the same exuberance of children playing car-trip games.  

Much has been written in recent years extolling the virtues of franchising as it exists in the United States.  However, there has been a dearth of information and analysis of the economic impact and potential of franchising, or similar economic expansion systems, in developing countries. Most of what has been written about international franchising has dealt with the legalities pertaining to franchise law, licensing, and trademark and patent law, and their disparities from country to country.  In spite of the scarcity of academic and research analysis, the period between the 1980s and the early-2000s witnessed a dramatic increase in international franchising and similar commercial expansion activity. This has occurred not only in Western Europe but also in Asia, South and Central America, Eastern Europe and, to a more modest extent, Africa and the Middle East. In this article, I attempt to point out some of the benefits and consequences of importing Western (essentially American) franchises and franchising techniques into developing economies.  

What is Failure Analysis?

TASA ID: 17993

Failure analysis for machinery, equipment and products may be viewed as a series of intentionally planned, sequential activities geared to understanding how the subject component came to be unfit for its original purpose. 

Failure analysis may be undertaken by people from many different career paths and professions. But for the type of failure analysis where something broke / got deformed / corroded / worn out, materials engineers are often involved, because a natural primary question is “Was there something wrong with the material?” When materials engineers get involved, then failure analysis is essentially an engineering process. 


FRAUD… I THOUGHT IT COULDN’T HAPPEN TO ME!

TASA ID: 408

Recently, I became intrigued with an advertisement on television for a product / service which appeared new.  It concerns a mobile telephone service which would cut my current service plan by about 50% … saving about $1,500 a year.  The advertisement indicates that a subscriber could use their current cell phone, merely removing the sim card and inserting the new one from this new carrier.  Although the new carrier does not have their own cell towers or cell facilities, it has contracted, according to the ad, to ‘bounce’ off two other very major cell carriers, depending upon the location of the call being made and the receiver of the call. 

How to Avoid and Deal with Pelvic Mesh Litigation

TASA ID: 10840

Republished with permission.

Abstract 

Medical malpractice as it relates to transvaginal mesh implantation adds another level of responsibility when deciding on surgical options to repair stress urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. As mesh is a viable option for repair, the informed consent process must involve a time commitment to discuss thoroughly the knowns and unknowns about mesh, and potentially must cover other aspects related to surgery: FDA classification of mesh, experience, potential off label usage, and conflicts of interest. A therapeutic alliance must be developed between physician and patient to allay possible fears about the intrinsic uncertainty of surgery. Proper risk assessment of the patient and pre-operative judgment as to when and if mesh implantation is appropriate are decisions that must be documented. Resolution of a conflict from a complication can be dealt with formally or informally. Above all, sharp skills, good communication, broad knowledge base of mesh surgeries, complication management, knowledge of guidelines, along with methodical documentation can mitigate or avert mesh-related litigation.

To read more, download the PDF below.

Life Care Planning For Spinal Cord Injuries

HEIDI PAUL, PH.D., CRC, CLCP, LPCC Associate Professor Coordinator MS Counseling, Option Rehabilitation California State University, Los Angeles

TASA ID:

A spinal cord injury (SCI) is harm to the spinal cord which causes physical, physiological, and/or emotional changes in an individual. Each year, there are 17,500 new spinal cord injuries, in the United States, there are between 245,000 and 353,000 Americans living with a spinal cord injury. Most spinal cord injuries occur in people ages 16-30 years old. The leading causes of spinal cord injuries, in order of most common: motor vehicle accidents, followed by falls, violence, and sporting accidents.

The spinal cord is part of the Central Nervous System (CNS), which consists of the brain and spinal cord. The Central Nervous system is responsible for receiving, integrating, and responding to environmental information. In addition, the CNS keeps our hearts beating, our lungs breathing, as well as metabolic processes functioning (involuntary functions). The CNS executes all muscle movement needed for accomplishing activities of daily life, feeding, dressing, toileting, bathing, transferring, and continence (voluntary function). 


RSS
12345678910Last

Categories


Let Us Find Your Expert 

Note: This form is to be completed by legal and insurance professionals ONLY. If you are a party in a case that requires an expert witness, please have your attorney contact TASA at 800-523-2319.

Submit

Search Experts

TASA provides a variety of quality, independent experts who meet your case criteria. Search our extensive list of experts now.

Search Experts