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Investigating Product Failure: Understanding the Development of a New Product

TASA ID: 79

Unlike Athena, a new product does not spring, fully formed, from the brow of the Vice President of Marketing. Most likely it arrives prematurely and requires heroic efforts just to survive.  Usually, but not always, its problems and weaknesses will have been resolved by the time it's released for sale:  The operative phrase being "Usually, but not always."

Human Factors Focus on Warnings, Part l: Labels, Signs, and Tags

TASA ID: 568

Failure to warn has become a common cause of action in products liability and tort litigation. Over the past 15 years, much scientific research has been conducted on the subjects of warning design and effectiveness.  As discussed here, a warning is a label, sign, or tag used to communicate hazard information. (Note: Part II, a sequel, will discuss visual and auditory warning devices and alarms.)  The purpose of a warning is to modify human behavior and ensure safety compliance, i.e. to give the worker or user an opportunity to avoid harm.
Category: Engineering, Safety

Things the Robot Safety Engineer Will Learn in Legal Depositions Now That the ISO 10218 Document Is Adopted by ANSI (The Primacy of OSHA over ISO is settled in an Ohio Court)

TASA ID: 3199

America is different from all other industrial nations due to the unique American system of justice. Any company who attempts to manufacture products and systems in America must be mindful of this significant difference. To ignore the difference is imprudent and not advised. In the unique American civil justice system the use of the advocate system, trial by jury, the lack of a ‘loser pays’ process  and the presence of the Occupation Safety and Health Administration sets the US apart from the rest of the industrialized world. Bluntly put: America is truly different from the rest of the world in industrial safety and our track record of safety success speaks for itself.

Electrical Equipment Failures Cause and Liability

TASA ID: 419

Many insurance claims and lawsuits are the result of electrical system failures.  The basis for such actions is frequently personal injury and/or property damage that can be caused by fire or other degradation of related systems, vehicles or structures.  It will be shown that electrical systems can have high inherent reliability to minimize end-product field service costs, safety hazards and, of course, liability. Failures of electrical systems are most frequently due to external factors such as poor design, improper use, faulty manufacturing, substandard service, mishandling and other causes. System malfunctions are rarely caused by random component failures and a properly executed failure analysis will almost always identify an entity liable for resultant damages.
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