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The Use of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Civil Litigation

TASA ID: 4724

Descriptions of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were first recorded in the sixth century B.C. Though the symptoms associated with the illness have remained generally the same, the name of the condition itself has changed many times. In World War I the disorder was labeled “shell shock,” linking the condition to the close lines between battling armies and the continuous firing of munitions. In World War II, the condition came to be called “combat neurosis.” The term “post-traumatic stress disorder” entered the psychiatric nomenclature with the 1980 publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd Edition

SCOPE OF THE PRACTICE OF ANESTHESIOLOGY

TASA ID: 1082

In today's medical environment with the increasing use of the Care Team Model to provide patient care services, anesthesiologists also provide onsite, immediately available medical direction of non-physician providers such as Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA's) who participate in the delivery of anesthesia care to the patient. The scope of the practice of anesthesiology also includes overseeing preoperative evaluation clinics and administrative responsibilities in the daily management of the operating room surgery schedule.

Analyzing Architectural Designs for Copyright Disputes

TASA ID: 10524

Introduction

There’s nothing simple about architectural copyright litigation. Activity generated from The Architectural Works Copyright Protection Act of 1990 continues to increase. The law continues to develop, but factual realities, though seemingly obvious, are often complex and difficult to compare What is an architectural work? It is a building design embodied in any tangible medium of expression, including a building itself, architectural plans, or drawings. Overall form is copyrightable. Exterior and interior spatial arrangements and elements of these arrangements are copyrightable. Individual standard features are not copyrightable. These presuppositions raise further questions. 

Part 2: Proximate Cause in Warnings Cases

Plaintiff’s Side

TASA ID: 4009

In many product liability cases there is something missing from an existing warning and instruction - some safety information which arguably the plaintiff did not know at the time of the accident. It may be relatively straight forward to figure out whether or not the existing warning was defective by reference to items like the ANSI Z353 Standards, signal word, color, conspicuity, language, grade level word choice, whether or not the warning adequately explains the hazard and the consequences of not heeding the warning and whether or not the warning explains what to do to avoid the hazard.  All of these are items which in general make a warning more likely to be noticed, read, understood and heeded.  That is exactly why the standards and authorities require them.  

Part 1: Proximate Cause Defense in Product Liability Warnings Cases

TASA ID: 4009

Jurors in product liability warnings cases strive to answer these two questions: 

  1. Was the warning on this product defective?
  2. Was a defect in this warning a proximate cause of this personal injury accident?

Plaintiffs do not prevail unless jurors provide a “yes” answer to both questions.  The kinds of arguments and the evidence presented for each of these questions are vastly different from each other.


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