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Non-Operating Room Anesthesia (NORA)

TASA ID: 16893

As technology improves in the health care world, more types of medical and surgical interventions are taking place in venues other than the operating room. Stand-alone surgical suites, endoscopy suites, interventional radiology, and dental procedures are just some examples of patient care environments that are an operating room alternative.

The Role of Background Checks in Firearm Ownership

TASA ID: 321

Firearm ownership is a very hot topic in this country. Mass shootings have further divided the country between pro-gun ownership and those wishing to tighten the laws or even eliminate private ownership of all or certain types of firearms.  Every state in the United States has their own policy on firearm ownership, some seemingly in conflict with federal laws. Even with all of this turmoil, it is important to understand the role that background checks play in firearm ownership. 

As attorneys, you may one day have a case that involves the use of a firearm and understanding why background checks are important in deciding who can and cannot own a firearm, the history of background checks, how they are performed and why they are relevant today may be useful knowledge if you ever have a case where a crime is committed and a firearm is involved. 

Date Rape Drugs:Psychiatry, Pharmacology and Law

Weaponized Chemistry, a Medicine Cabinet of Assault

TASA ID: 9505

This article was originally published on https://www.forensicpsychiatrynow.com/date-rape-drugs, posted May 15, 2018. 

Drug‑Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSA) is the use of drugs and/or alcohol by a sexual predator to render a victim incapacitated and unable to fight back against a sexual assault. A side effect of many “Date Rape” or “Club Drugs” is also anterograde amnesia, the inability to recall what happened while drugged, increasing a predator’s belief he will “get away with it.”  Those odds are shifting, but attorneys, Courts, and potential victims are better served if they understand some of the drugs used and their impact on mind and body. 
 
DFSA is more easily prosecuted if reported while the drug is still in the victim’s system and thus testable by a toxicology screen. Each drug has a different deterioration time for detection. Luckily, law enforcement protocols now better respond with urgency to obtain a blood test when a DFSA is reported.  The Drug-Induced Rape Prevention and Punishment Act of 1996 provides for more severe sentencing. Public awareness, particularly after the recent Bill Cosby trial, has made potential victims warier of at least the most obvious DFSA attempts.

To read the full article, click here

Training Security Operatives to Recognize the Perils Posed by Weapons of Mass Exposure

Part II

TASA ID: 12689

This article was originally posted in the Journal of Healthcare Protection Management, Vol. 35, No. 1 - 2019.

In a 2007 article in this journal, the authors detailed how to protect staff, patients and visitors from becoming contaminated after attacks by weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) or weapons of mass exposure.  Given security's central role in keeping hospitals free from contamination, here they update the advice for today's world.  They review the contaminants of concern, addressing the basics of effective training for security officers, how to handle the flow of vehicles and people, when to institute lockdowns, and how to don and remove personal protective equipment (PPEs).

To read more, download the PDF below.

Commercial Transportation Hours of Service Rule:

The Effect on Driver Behavior

TASA ID: 6742

Abstract


In an effort to decrease accidents and unsafe practices and determine cause, this applied dissertation researched the impact of the Hours of Service rule implemented by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on commercial driver and commercial carrier behaviors. The Hours of Service rule served as a method to increase safety on highways by regulating and monitoring the driving hours of the commercial driver. This study attempted to discover whether this rule had an impact on driver behavior as well as commercial carrier behavior. 

This study was designed to answer questions directed toward safety, compliance, and effective ways to assert safety compliance including if the Hours of Service rules are effective in modifying behaviors associated with safety, whether the Hours of Service rules are effective in modifying behaviors associated with compliance, and if the Hours of Service rules an effective way to assert safety compliance within the commercial transportation industry.

To arrive at these conclusions, the researcher conducted a study that used surveys completed by commercial drivers and motor carrier representatives. It was determined that overall, most drivers agree that various methods of enforcement are necessary; they do not necessarily abide by them. The primary reason given was the loss of financial gain that adherence creates.  The study may benefit businesses, individuals, and communities that are involved in the transportation industry by adapting methods of enforcement that do not penalize a driver financially. The solution can be as simple as an increase in wages for the driver. 

This may not be of financial benefit to the motor carrier company in the form of immediate profit but serves as a profit in the form of avoidance of probable law suits initiated by persons affected in a motor carrier accident. It is also of profit to the motor carrier in reduced insurance premiums and equipment replacement.

 

To read more, download the article below. 


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